Computer beats human pro at Japanese chess

Shogi is played with 40 pieces on a 9×9 board.

(Credit: Oliver Orschiedt/Wikimedia Commons)

Humanity lost a little more ground to machines last weekend, in case you’re counting down the days to when Skynet takes charge of the planet.

A computer defeated a professional Japanese chess (shogi) player for the first time in a public match, Kyodo News tells us grimly.

A program called Ponanza, developed by Issei Yamamoto, took down 30-year-old Shinichi Sato on Saturday in the Shogi Master Versus Machine Match.

Sato was doing well until he made mistakes midway through the game.

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